Reliability Engineering Management

ENRE 642, a 3 credits graduate level course with the University of Maryland. Starting June 1, 2015

Taught each summer (in person and/or distance learning) and by special arrangement with university.

I think it is great to have someone teaching a class that works in industry and has real-world experience with businesses.” – former student

To learn more and to register visit the Office of Advanced Engineering Education

Contact University of Maryland to sign up for the course.

To learn more and to register visit the Office of Advanced Engineering Education

Course Syllabus

Unifying systems perspective of reliability engineering management. Design, development and management of organizations and reliability programs including: management of systems evaluation and test protocols, development of risk management-mitigation processes, and management of functional tasks performed by reliability engineers.

The course has an emphasis on understanding the value of reliability activities within the entire product lifecycle. Case studies of actual organizations focused on determining the key considerations when attempting to improve the organization’s ability to produce reliable products.

Enjoyed the course thoroughly.  Definitely should not be without ENRE642 in any RE masters.  Makes us truly realize what the hell the Math is all for!”   -Wendell, former student

Course Instructor

Fred Schenkelberg FMS Reliability (408) 710-8248 fms@fmsreliability.com

Recommended Text

O’Connor, Patrick D. T. and Andre Kleyner Practical Reliability Engineering, 5th Ed. Wiley, 2012.

References

Ireson, W. Grant, Coombs, Clyde F. and Moss, Richard Y., McGraw-Hill [“Moss book”, is how I commonly refer to this text]

Mark A. Levin and Ted T. Kalal, Improving Product Reliability: Strategies and Implementation, 2003, Wiley

Philip B. Crosby, Quality sf Free: The Art of Making Quality Certain, 1979, New American Library

Henry Petroski, Design Paradigms: Case Histories of Error and Judgment in Engineering, 1994, Cambridge University Press

Grading

Homework 20% (Due at start of Mid term)

Mid Term 25%

Project 25% (Due at start of Final)

Final 30%

Course Outline

Review material in Moss, other references are optional.

  • Introduction and design for reliability
  • Value of reliability to business
  • Evaluating the maturity of reliability approach
  • Crosby Chap 3
  • Engineering approaches to product reliability
  • Setting reliability goals and apportionment
  • Building a reliability plan
  • Identifying risks to reliability goal
  • Using HALT and its benefits
  • Using ALT and other reliability testing
  • Using product level reliability models
  • Sample sizes and a few trade-offs
  • Encouraging use of FA and FRACAS
  • Making good measurements
  • Considerations in thermal design
  • Understanding stress/strength and derating
  • Considering the product’s environment
  • Managing the supplier’s reliability program
  • Building a reliability culture in an organizaton
  • Review

Plus topics of interest to students as time permits.